28/1/15

Inspiration // Ayaka Yamamoto

© Ayaka Yamamoto
© Ayaka Yamamoto
© Ayaka Yamamoto

Ayaka Yamamoto
Born in 1983 in Kobe, Japan.
“I choose to photograph places that I cannot imagine, even from the images that have accumulated under my eyelids, and where the languages and things I already know have no value.”

22/1/15

Inspiration // Miho Kajioka

© Miho Kajioka
© Miho Kajioka

© Miho Kajioka

© Miho Kajioka

© Miho Kajioka
© Miho Kajioka
© Miho Kajioka



"as it is" statement:

For many years I didn’t pursue my work as an artist, but tragedy returned me to it. 

After studying fine art in the U.S. and Canada, I arrived back in my native Japan and began a career in journalism. It was Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami that reconnected me to photography. Two months after the disaster, while reporting in the coastal city of Kamaishi, where over 800 people died, I found roses blooming beside a blasted building. That mixture of grace and ruin made me think of a Japanese poem: 

In the spring, cherry blossoms, 
In the summer the cuckoo, 
In autumn the moon, and in 
Winter the snow, clear, cold. 

Written by the Zen monk Dogen, the poem describes the fleeting, fragile beauty of the changing seasons. The roses I saw in Kamaishi bloomed simply because it was spring. That beautiful and uncomplicated statement, made by roses in the midst of ruin, impressed me, and returned me to photography. 

The photos I am presenting here, “as it is,” span my adulthood, including pictures I took while living abroad, as well as scenes I captured in Japan after the disaster. I snapped the horizontal shot of a girl walking along the sea in Fukushima, 60 km from the nuclear plant, a year after the accident. The two almost indistinguishable photographs of a girl swinging were taken within seconds of each other, and together they show the passage of time. The little pictures of a flower, or a running boy, are scenes from daily life, as it is. 

These fragments of my life, from various periods and against changing backdrops, are not so different from each other, and the differences that remain aren't important. Happiness, sadness, beauty and tragedy only exist in our minds. Things are just as they are. 

If you look closely, you'll see that underlying truth in the empty spaces I leave in my work. Blank space is fundamental to Japanese aesthetics. I remember in San Francisco I had an art teacher who dressed like a cowboy. “You have unfinished space—fill it with paint!” he’d tell me. “There’s no need,” I’d answer. “This is complete.”

Miho Kajioka



15/1/15

Inspiration // Milja Laurila

© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla
© Milja Laurilla

To remember

"I have few memories from my childhood. After my father died when I was eleven, I tried to forget my life up to that point. I didn’t want to remember. In our family pictures, I saw unfamiliar places and people I couldn’t recognize. My works are based on old family photographs taken by my father. He worked for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland and was a keen amateur photographer. He had three cameras, and he made markings on his negative pages with a green pen. From one of the pages the negatives are missing – only my father’s markings are left. The missing negatives are like my memories: knowing that they are gone makes their presence even stronger. In the photographic series To remember (2004–2007), I use the technique of multiple exposures to merge the past images with the present. For me, it is important that the elements of the picture are not separable, but rather constitute a whole, also physically. The unpredictability of the method, the haziness of the pictures and the faded colors reflect my experience of forgetting and remembering. My photographs are not recollections but rather images of forgetting, memories I am unable to reach."

Milja Laurila
Born 1982 in Helsinki, Finland.


5/12/14

Inspiration // Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius
© Lina Scheynius

"How / when / where did you start taking pictures? 
 I wanted to start sooner but my parents thought I would break the camera so I had to wait until they decided I was old enough and bought one for me. So I started on my 10th birthday, in my home, taking pictures of the cake and my feet and my best friend sitting on the toilet. Pretty much the same thing I do now." 

Lina Scheynius

Born in Vänersborg (Sweden) in 1981 and currently based in London.
Nació en Vänersborg (Suecia) en 1981 y actualmente vive en Londres.

28/11/14

Inspiration // Sophia Sobers

© Sophia Sobers
© Sophia Sobers
© Sophia Sobers
© Sophia Sobers
© Sophia Sobers


"Sophia Sobers es una artista interdisciplinar que crea esculturas, instalaciones y ambientes en un proceso continuo de cruzar fronteras entre la ciencia, la naturaleza y lo espiritual."

"Sophia Sobers is an interdisciplinary artist who creates sculptures, installations and environments in an ongoing process of crossing boundaries between science, nature and the spiritual."

More info here.